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Guidelines_English_Final

 

Curriculum Vitae

 

Personal Data

 

First name: Zouhair                                           Family name: Maalej

Sex: Male

Date/Place of Birth: 29 April 1954/ Sfax – Tunisia

Nationality: Tunisian

Marital Status: Married with two children.

Work address:

 

College of Languages & Translation
King Saud University
P.O. Box 87907, Riyadh 11652, KSA

 

Office phone: (+966) 1-497015 (Office 2127)
Mobile: (+966) 054-285-3684

Emails: zmaalej@ksu.edu.sa; zouhairmaalej@gmail.com; zmaalej@gnet.tn

URL: http://faculty.ksa.edu.sa/zmaalej

 

Education

 

  • 2003: Habilitation (Post-doctoral Degree), Faculty of Letters, Manouba (University of Manouba).
  • 1990: Ph.D. (D.R.A.), University of Tunis, Faculty of Letters, Manouba, Department of English. Title: “Metaphor in Political and Economic Texts.”
  • 1984: MA (C.A.R.), University of Tunis, Faculty of Arts 9 April, Department of English. Title: “A Contrastive Analysis of English and Arabic Complement Sentences.”
  • 1980: BA (Maitrise), University of Tunis, Faculty of Arts 9 April, Department of English

 

Professional experience

 

§   2013-2014 (Professor): Responsible for lecturing undergraduate students at the Department of English Language and Translation, College of Languages & Translation, King Saud University, and supervising doctoral students within the frame of the co-supervision program and evaluating doctoral dissertations. 

§   2012-2013 (Professor): Responsible for lecturing undergraduate students and coordinating the Self-Study Report in view of applying for national academic accreditation at the Department of English Language and Translation, College of Languages & Translation, King Saud University, and supervising doctoral students within the frame of the co-supervision program and evaluating doctoral dissertations. 

§   2011-2012 (Professor): Responsible for lecturing undergraduate students at the Department of English Language and Translation, College of Languages & Translation, King Saud University.    

§   2010-2011 (Professor): Responsible for lecturing undergraduate students and coordinating the Self-Study Report in view of obtaining international academic accreditation at the Department of European Languages and Translation, College of Languages & Translation, King Saud University. 

§   2009-2010 (Associate Professor): Responsible for lecturing undergraduate students at the Department of European Languages and Translation, College of Languages & Translation, King Saud University. 

§   2008-2009 (Associate Professor): Responsible for lecturing undergraduate students at the Department of European Languages and Translation, College of Languages & Translation, King Saud University. 

§   2007-2008 (Associate Professor): Responsible for lecturing undergraduate students at the Department of European Languages and Translation, College of Languages & Translation, King Saud University. 

§   2006-2007 (Associate Professor): Responsible for the design, preparation, selection of course materials, and lecturing undergraduate and postgraduate students.  Coordinator of academic and pedagogic affairs at the department of English, Ecole Normale Superieure, Tunis. Responsible for advising postgraduate students on their MA and Ph.D. work.

§   2005-2006 (Associate Professor): Responsible for the design, preparation, selection of course materials, and lecturing undergraduate and postgraduate students.  Responsible for advising postgraduate students on their MA and Ph.D. work.

§   2004-2005 (Associate Professor): Chair of Department of English, Faculty of Letters, Arts, and Humanities (University of Manouba). Responsible for academic/pedagogic and administrative activities in the department. Responsible for the design, preparation, selection of course materials, and lecturing undergraduate and postgraduate students.  Responsible for advising postgraduate students on their MA and Ph.D. work.

§   2003-2004 (Assistant Professor): Chair of Department of English, Faculty of Letters, Arts, and Humanities (University of Manouba). Responsible for academic/pedagogic and administrative activities in the department. Responsible for the design, preparation, selection of course materials, and lecturing undergraduate and postgraduate students.  Responsible for advising postgraduate students on their MA work.

§   2002-2003 (Assistant Professor): Senior Fulbright scholar at the Department of linguistics, Albuquerque (University of New Mexico). Responsible for the design, preparation, selection of course materials, and lecturing postgraduate students a course on Topics in Cognitive Pragmatics. 

§   1999 – 2002 (Assistant Professor): Head of Department of English, Faculty of Arts, Manouba, University of Manouba. Responsible for academic/pedagogic and administrative activities in the department. Responsible for the design, preparation, selection of course materials, and lecturing undergraduate and postgraduate students. 

§  1993–1999 (Assistant Professor): Responsible for the design, preparation, selection of course materials, and lecturing undergraduate students. 

§  1990–1993 (Research Assistant): Responsible for the design, preparation, selection of course material, and lecturing undergraduate students.

§  1985-1990 (PES): Responsible for the preparation and teaching of language courses for students in departments other than English at University.

 

Teaching philosophy

Every teaching philosophy is guided by the kind of personality, qualification, and training the instructor has. My philosophy stems from my deep conviction that the quality of teaching can be better sustained if it is the product of interaction between research activities and teaching practices.

My research, which draws on the insights of cognitive science and the conceptual theory of metaphor, has had a great impact on better understanding how learning comes to take place in the mind. Awareness of facilitators (attention, motivation, entrenchment) and impediments (memory, demotivation, deficient attentional processes) to learning can maximize learning in general and language learning in particular. Cognitive science taught me that although memory is an important cognitive ability, it is not to be depended upon as the only resourceful capacity that students should rely upon to learn. They need to think in such a way that they can reflect upon various issues related to their life as human beings, as citizens within their own community and country, and possibly as expatriates in the world at large. One of the important issues that they need to think about is their own language, without losing sight of other languages that they might have learnt. This leads me to talking about translation as a discipline in need of the insights of the research accumulated in the study of human communication at large and the different neural, cognitive, and cultural factors inherent in the production of translated discourses, both oral and written.

The interaction between research and practice cannot work efficiently without accommodating the students’ needs, simplifying theory, and adapting it to their cognitive needs. My courses interact with my research by being a kind of fodder for my research, which investigates problems and difficulties arising from and through either what I teach the students or the learning difficulties that they might experience. In particular, metaphor as a cognitive tool tends to play a big role as a facilitating device in my teaching methodology as well as a mode of reflection on various concepts in research and course material. In this way, a maximal use is made of theory to resolve learning problems and difficulties and a maximal use is made of practical learning difficulties and problems to verify the extent to which theory and practice are in harmony with one another.

 

ISI Publications

  1. Maalej, Z. (1999). Metaphor making and processing. Journal of Literary Semantics, 28(2), 105-123.
  2. Maalej, Z. (1999). Metaphoric discourse in the age of cognitive linguistics, with special reference to Tunisian Arabic. Journal of Literary Semantics, 28(3), 189-206.
  3. Maalej, Z. (2004). Figurative language in anger expressions in Tunisian Arabic: An extended view of embodiment. Metaphor and Symbol, 19(1), 51-75.
  4. Maalej, Z. (2008). The heart and cultural embodiment in Tunisian Arabic. In F. Sharifian, R. Dirven, N. Yu & S. Niemeier (Eds.), Culture, body, and language: Conceptualizations of internal body organs across cultures and languages (pp. 395-428). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
  5. 5.       Maalej, Z. (2010). Addressing non-acquaintances in Tunisian Arabic: A cognitive-pragmatic account. Intercultural Pragmatics, 7(1), 147-173.
  6. 6.      Maalej, Z. (2012). The “Jasmine Revolt” has made the “Arab Spring”: A critical discourse analysis of the last three political speeches of the ousted president of Tunisia. DISCOURSE & SOCIETY 23(6), 679-700.
  7. Maalej, Z. (2013). Framing and manipulation of person deixis in Husni Mubarak’s last three speeches: A cognitive-pragmatic approach. Pragmatics, 23(4), 633-659.
  8. Maalej, Z. (2013). Book review of Christopher Hart (ed.). Critical Discourse Studies in Context and Cognition (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins (2011), Cognitive Linguistics, 24(2), 385-392.

 

Ongoing projects

1.      Maalej, Z., Mohamed Al-Ghabban, & Sami Ben Salameh. (to be submitted to Language Learning). Saudi students’ conceptualization of learning.

2. Ben Salameh, S., Zouheir A. Maalej, & Mohamed Al-Ghabban. (to be submitted to Intercultural Pragmatics). To be or not to be your son’s father/mother: A cognitive-pragmatic perspective on terms of address in the MENA area.

3.      Al-Ghabban, M., Sami Ben Salameh, & Zouheir A. Maalej. (to be submitted to Applied Linguistics). Saudi metaphors of learning, with special reference to teaching philosophy statements.

4.      Maalej, Z. Of animals, foods, objects, plants, and others, or how women are conceptualized and evaluated across languages and cultures.

5.      Maalej, Z. ESL Saudi students’ receptive and productive metaphoric proficiency.

6.      Maalej, Z. Metaphors some Saudi women live by, with special reference to pseudonyms.

7.      Maalej, Z. Motion events in Arabic: Implications for verb-framed and satellite-framed languages.

8.      Maalej, Z. What a Neural Theory of Language can tell us about the mind and our teaching profession.

9.      Maalej, Z. A unified cognitive framework for translating figurative language.

10.  Maalej, Z. A cognitive-pragmatic view of categories and translation: Prototypes and Frame Semantics.

11.  Maalej, Z. Words can kill: The discourse of political violence after the “Jasmine Revolt” in Tunisia.

12.  Maalej, Z. The president that should never have been one: The diplomatic blunders of Tunisia’s current president.

 

Publications

 

  1. Maalej, Z. (1994). English-Arabic machine translation of nominal compounds. In P. Bouillon & D. Estival (Eds.), Proceedings of the workshop on compound Nouns: Multilingual aspects of nominal composition (pp. 135-146). Geneva: ISSCO.
  2. Maalej, Z. (1998-99). Passives in Modern Standard and Tunisian Arabic. Matériaux Arabes et Sudarabiques-Gellas 9, 51-76.
  3. Maalej, Z. (1999). Metaphor making and processing. Journal of Literary Semantics, 28(2), 105-123.
  4. Maalej, Z. (1999). Metaphoric discourse in the age of cognitive linguistics, with special reference to Tunisian Arabic. Journal of Literary Semantics, 28(3), 189-206.
  5. Maalej, Z. (1999). Interpersonal perception in self-promotional discourse. The Tunisian Review of Modern Languages 9, 155-174.
  6. Maalej, Z. (2000). Passives in modern standard and Tunisian Arabic. In M. Mifsud, (Ed.), Proceedings of the third international conference of AIDA (Association Internationale de Dialectologie Arabe) (pp. 21-26). Malta: Salesian Press. 
  7. Maalej, Z. (2001). Processing pictorial metaphor in advertising: A cross-cultural view. Academic Research, 1(1), 19-42.
  8. Maalej, Z. (2002). The image-schematic anchorage of the preposition fi (in): The logic of containment in Tunisian Arabic. In: S. Csábi & J. Zerkowitz (Eds.), Textual secrets: The message of the medium (pp. 227-236). (Proceedings of the 21st PALA Conference). Budapest, Hungary: Eötvös Lorand University.
  9. Maalej, Z. (2002). Modal auxiliaries: A proposal for an experientialist-pragmatic account. Etudes Linguistiques 4, 59-83.
  10. Maalej, Z. (2003). Guidelines for the translation of English nominal compounds into Arabic: A computational discourse model. The Tunisian Review of Modern Languages 11, 139-167.
  11. Maalej, Z. (2003). Conceptual metaphor as persuasion, with special reference to consumer advertising: A cognitive semantics account. In M. Triki & A. Sellami-Baklouti (Eds.), Pragmatic perspectives on persuasion (pp. 121-147). Sfax, Tunisia: Faculty of Letters and Humanities.
  12. Maalej, Z. (2004). Figurative language in anger expressions in Tunisian Arabic: An extended view of embodiment. Metaphor and Symbol, 19(1), 51-75.
  13. Maalej, Z. (2005). Assigning metaphoric interpretations to basic-level categories among Arab students of English. In Z. Maalej (Ed.), Metaphor, cognition, and culture (pp. 133-162). Manouba, Tunis: Publications of the University of Manouba.
  14. Maalej, Z. (2005). (Ed.). Metaphor, cognition and culture: Selected papers from the fourth conference on researching and applying metaphor. Manouba, Tunis: Faculty of Letters, Arts, and Humanities.
  15. Maalej, Z. (2006). Middle verbs. In Eid, M., A. Elgibali, M. Woidich, & A. Zaborski (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Arabic language and linguistics (EALL) (Vol. 3). Leiden – Boston: BRILL.
  16. Maalej, Z. (2007). The embodiment of fear expressions in Tunisian Arabic: Theoretical and practical implications. In F. Sharifian & G. B. Palmer (Eds.), Applied cultural linguistics: Implications for second language learning and intercultural communication (pp. 87-104). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  17. Maalej, Z. (2007). Doing critical discourse analysis with the contemporary theory of metaphor: Towards a discourse model of metaphor. In C. Hart & D. Lukeš (Eds.), Cognitive linguistics in critical discourse studies: Application and theory (pp. 132-158). Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Press.
  18. Maalej, Z. (2008). Valency. In Eid, M., A. Elgibali, M. Woidich, & A. Zaborski (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Arabic language and linguistics (EALL) (Vol. 4) (pp. 624-627). Leiden – Boston: BRILL.
  19.  Maalej, Z. (2008). Metaphors of learning and knowledge in the Tunisian context: A case of re-categorization. In E. Berendt (Ed.), Metaphors of Learning (pp. 205-223). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
  20. Maalej, Z. (2008). Translating metaphor between unrelated cultures: A cognitive-pragmatic perspective. Sayyab Translation Journal, 1, 60-82.
  21. Maalej, Z. (2008). The heart and cultural embodiment in Tunisian Arabic. In F. Sharifian, R. Dirven, N. Yu & S. Niemeier (Eds.), Culture, body, and language: Conceptualizations of internal body organs across cultures and languages (pp. 395-428). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
  22. Maalej, Z. (2009). A cognitive-pragmatic perspective on proverbs and its implications for translation. International Journal of Arabic-English Studies (IJAES) 10, 135-154.
  23. Maalej, Z. (2009). An idealized cognitive model of naming: Converging linguistic and cognitive evidence from Tunisian Arabic. In A. Odebunmi, A. Arua & S. Arimi (Eds.), Language, Gender and Politics: a Festschrift for Yisa Kehinde Yusuf (pp. 55–63). Lagos: Centre for Black and African Arts and Civilization.
  24. 24.  Maalej, Z. (2010). Addressing non-acquaintances in Tunisian Arabic: A cognitive-pragmatic account. Intercultural Pragmatics, 7(1), 147-173.
  25. Maalej, Z. (2011). Ideological and non-ideological metaphors: A cognitive-pragmatic perspective. In K. Berrada & A. Jehfa (Eds.), Metaphor and cognition (pp. 97-122). Morocco: Laboratory Publications: Linguistics and Communication Labs.
  26. Maalej, Z. & N. Yu. (Eds.) (2011). Embodiment via body parts: Studies from various languages and cultures. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  27. Maalej, Z. (2011). Figurative dimensions of 3ayn ‘eye’ in Tunisian Arabic. In Z. Maalej & N. Yu (Eds.), Embodiment via body parts: Studies from various languages and cultures (pp. 213-240). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  28. Maalej, Z. & N. Yu. (2011). Introduction: Embodiment via body parts. In Maalej, Z. & N. Yu (Eds.), Embodiment via body parts: Studies from various languages and cultures (pp. 1-20). Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  29.  Maalej, Z. & N. Yu (Eds.). (2011). Embodiment via body parts: Studies from various languages and cultures. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  30. Hadlaq, M. S., & Maalej, Z. (2012). Conceptualization of anger in Saudi and Tunisian Arabic dialects. In P. Wilson (Ed.), Dynamicity in emotion concepts (Vol. 27, pp. 205-231). Frankfurt: Peter Lang.
  31.  Maalej, Z. (2012). The “Jasmine Revolt” has made the “Arab Spring”: A critical discourse analysis of the last three political speeches of the ousted president of Tunisia. DISCOURSE & SOCIETY 23(6), 679-700.
  32. Maalej, Z. (2013). Framing and manipulation of person deixis in Husni Mubarak’s last three speeches: A cognitive-pragmatic approach. Pragmatics, 23(4), 633-659.
  33. Maalej, Z. (2013). Book review of Christopher Hart (ed.). Critical Discourse Studies in Context and Cognition (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins (2011), Cognitive Linguistics, 24(2), 385-392.
  34. Maalej, Z. (Forthcoming, 2014). Body parts we live by in language and culture: The raS ‘head’ and yidd ‘hand’ in Tunisian Arabic. In I. Kraska-Szlenk and M. Brenzinger (Eds.), The body in language: Metaphor, grammar and culture (pp. ). (Brill Studies in Language, Cognition and Culture). Leiden – Boston: BRILL.
  35. Maalej, Z. (Forthcoming, 2014). Persuasion and counter-persuasion of visual metaphor in consumer advertising, In Diana Yankova (Ed.), Festschrift to Elzbieta Tabakowska. (submitted to the editor).
  36. Maalej, Z. (submitted to Metaphor and Symbol). The body in conceptualization: Emotions from the perspective of cultural embodiment.
  37. Maalej, Z. (submitted to Metaphor and Symbol). Culturally embodied conceptualizations of cultural values and personality traits.
  38. Maalej, Z. (submitted to Metaphor and the Social World). Multimodal metaphors and metonymies, with special reference to KSU2030 Strategic Plan.

 

Book reviews

 

  1. (2001). Review of Pragmatic meaning and cognition (by Sophia Marmaridou, 2000). Journal of Literary Semantics, 30(3), 203-210.
  2. (2001). Review of Simultaneous interpretation: A cognitive-pragmatic analysis (by Robin Setton, 1999). Journal of Literary Semantics, 30(3), 210-214. [Also available online at http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/10/10-1951.html]

3.  (2001). Review of The language of deception. A discourse analytical study (by Dariusz Galasinski, 2000). Discourse Studies, 3(3), 376-78.

4.   (2001). Review of Gesture, speech and sign (by Lynn Messing & Ruth Campbell (Eds.), 1999). Sign Language Studies, 2(1), 116-131. [Also available online at http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/11/11-2175.html]

5.   (2002). Review of Metaphor and metonymy at the crossroads: A cognitive perspective (by Antonio Barcelona (Ed.), 2000). Language and Literature, 11(2), 180-183.

6.   (2002). Review of Brown tide rising: Metaphors of Latinos in contemporary American public discourse (by Otto Santa Ana, 2002). Discourse & Society, 15(1), 134-135.

7.   Review of Language and space (1999), by Mary Bloom, A. Peterson, Lynn Nadel & Merrill F. Garrett (eds.). Cambridge/London: The MIT Press. [Available online at http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/11/11-1672.html#1]

8.    Review of Perception, cognition and language: Essays in honor of Henry and Lila Gleitman (2000), by Barbara Landau, John Sabini, John Jonides & Elissa L. Newport (eds.). Cambridge/London: The MIT Press. [Available online at http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/12/12-1254.html]

9.   Review of Pragmatics: Critical concepts (Pragmatics, grammar, psychology, sociology, Vol. VI) (1998) by Asa Kasher (Ed.). London & New York: Routledge. ([Available online at http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/12/12-221.html]

10.  Review of Contexts of metaphor (2001), by Michiel Leezenberg. Amsterdam and London: Elsevier. [Available online at http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/12/12-3034.html]

11.  Review of Language, cognition, and the brain. Insights from sign language research (2002), by Karen Emmorey. New Jersey/London:  Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. [Available online at http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/13/13-1631.html]

12.  Review of Modality and its interaction with the verbal system (2002), by Sjef Barbiers, Frits Beukema, and Wim van der Wurff (Eds). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

13.  Review of Relevance and linguistic meaning: The semantics and pragmatics of discourse Markers, by Diane Blakemore (2002). Cambridge: CUP. [Available online at http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/14/14-459.html]

14.  Review of Pragmatics and discourse: A resource book for students, by Joan Cutting (2002). London and New York: Routledge (Routledge English Language Introductions). [Available online at http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/14/14-1015.html]

15.  Review of Children’s discourse: Person, space and time across languages, by Maya Hickmann (2003). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics 98). [Available online at http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/14/14-1368.html]

16.    Review of Deictic conceptualisation of space, time and person, edited by Friedrich Lenz (2003). Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company (Pragmatics & Beyond New Series 112). [Available online at http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/14/14-2209.html]

17.  Review of Cognitive models in language and thought: Ideology, metaphors and meanings (2003), edited by René Dirven, Roslyn Frank, and Martin Pütz. Mouton de Gruyter, Cognitive Linguistics Research 24. [Available online at http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/14/14/3047.html] and http://ml.osdir.com/science.linguistics.linguist-list/2003-11/msg00065.html

18.  (2006). Review of Modality in contemporary English (edited by Roberta Facchinetti, Manfred Krug, and Frank Palmer, 2003). Journal of English Linguistics, 34(1), 60-65.

19.  Review of An introduction to critical discourse analysis in education (2004), edited by Rebecca Rogers. Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. [Available online at http://listserv.uts.edu.au/archives/sys-func/2005-February/003248.html

 

 

Journals contributed to

 

  1. Academic Research (Tunisia)
  2. Discourse & Society
  3. Discourse Studies
  4. Intercultural Pragmatics
  5. Journal of Arabic-English Studies (Jordan)
  6. Journal of English Linguistics
  7. Journal of King Saud University, Languages and Translation
  8. Journal of Literary Semantics
  9. Language and Literature
  10. Metaphor & Symbol
  11. Sign Language Studies
  12. Tunisian Review of Modern Languages

 

Citations

  1. Al-Hasnawi Ali R. (2007). A cognitive approach to translating metaphors. Cultural Aspects, 11(3). Available online at http://www.accurapid.com/journal/41metaphor.htm (Accessed 6-4-2008).
  2. Al-Kharabsheh, Aladdin (2005). The interpretation of terminological constructions: The case of techno-scientific nominal compounds. Journal of Language and Linguistics, 4(2), 161-182.
  3. Caballero, Rosario (2007). Book review. Metaphor and Symbol, 22(1), 109-118.
  4. Cameron, L., & Deignan, A. (2006). The emergence of metaphor in discourse. Applied Linguistics, 27(4), 671-690.
  5. Dickins, J. (2005). Two models for metaphor translation. Target, 17(2), 227-273.
  6. Fareh, Shehdeh and Bin Moussa, Maher (2007). Practicality and usefulness of English-Arabic dictionaries in translating English metaphors. Babel, 53(1), 32-47.
  7. Forceville, C. (2006). Non-verbal and multimodal metaphor in a cognitivist framework: Agendas for  Research. In G. Kristiansen, M. Achard, R. Dirven & F. R. Mendoza (Eds.), Cognitive linguistics: Current applications and future perspectives (pp. 379-402). Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
  8. Forceville, C. (2007). Multimodal metaphor in ten Dutch TV commercials.  The Public Journal of Semiotics, 1(1), 15-34.
  9. Gibbs, R. W. (2006). Embodiment and cognitive science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  10. Koller, V. (2003). Metaphor clusters in business media discourse: A social cognition approach. Ph.D. Dissertation: University of Vienna.
  11. Kövecses, Z. (2005). Metaphor in culture: Universality and variation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  12. Kövecses, Z. (2005). Language, mind, and culture. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  13. Lima-Hernandez, Maria Célia (2006). Níveis no processamento da comparação no Português contemporâneo e padrões funcionais de como. Estudios Lingüisticos, XXXV, 1322-1330.
  14. Lukeš, D. (2007). What does it mean when texts “really” mean something?: Types of evidence for conceptual patterns in discourse. In C. Hart & D. Lukeš (Eds.), Cognitive linguistics in critical discourse studies: Application and theory (pp. 180-206). Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Press.
  15. MacArthur, F. (2005). The competent horseman in a horseless world: Observations on a conventional metaphor in Spanish and English. Metaphor and Symbol, 20(1), 71-94.
  16. Opez Rodriguez, Irene (2007). The representation of women in teenage and women's magazines: Recurring metaphors in English. Estudios Ingleses de la Universidad Complutense, 15, 15-42.
  17. Romero, E., & Soria, B. (2005). Cognitive metaphor theory revisited. Journal of Literary Semantics, 34(1), 1-20.
  18. Strack, D. C. (2007). Literature in the crucible of translation: A cognitive account. Okayama, Japan: University Education Press.
  19. Wilcox, P. P. (in press). Constructs of the mind: Cross-linguistic contrast of metaphor in spoken and signed languages. In E. Pizzuto, P. Pietrandrea, & R. Simone (Eds.), Verbal and signed languages: Comparing structures, constructs and methodologies (pp. 249-270). Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
  20. Wolf, Hans-Goerg & Frank Polzenhagen (2003). Conceptual metaphor as ideological stylistic means: An exemplary analysis. In Dirven, René, Roslyn Frank & Martin Pütz (Eds.), Cognitive Models in Language and Thought: Ideology, Metaphors and Meanings. Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter, pp. 247-275.
  21. Wu, Wanwei (2003). Metaphor translation in political texts. US-China Foreign Language, Oct. (Monthly), 73-81.
  22. Yu, N. (2008). Metaphor from body and culture. In R. W. Gibbs (Ed.), The Cambridge handbook of metaphor and thought (pp. 247-261). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

 

MA and Ph.D. supervision

 

Name of candidate

Research topic

Institution

Date of defense

1

Hager Rebei (MA)

A critical discourse analysis of the political speeches of Bush towards the Arabs since 9/11

ISLT

2004

2

Neila Ben Dhia

Hedging in scientific articles

ISLT

2004

3

Moufida Mnakri (MA)

Metaphor in English-Arabic telecommunication technology: A cognitive view

ISLT

2005

4

 

Nadia Hamrouni (MA)

On the structure of construct states in Tunisian Arabic

FLAH

July 2005

5

Jamil Ben Whida (MA)

A cognitive-pragmatic account of terms of address in Tunisian Arabic

ISLT

October 2006

6

Mohamed Ramzi Ghanmi (MA)

A cross-cultural study of unpleasant announcements in English and Tunisian Arabic

ISLT

October 2006

7

Salma Cherif (MA)

Humor within a relevance-theoretic framework with special reference to “Caricatures”

ISLT

November 2006

8

Chiraz Fatnassi (MA)

A cross-cultural study of Tunisian and English refusals

ISLT

November 2006

9

Nadia Friaa (MA)

Metaphor in the African and European football cups 2004: Tunisian Arabic and English data

ISLT

October 2006

10

Moncef Kharroubi (DEA)

Expressing disagreement by native and non-native speakers of English among university teachers and researchers in academic conferences

FLAH

April 2007

11

Mokhtar Ounis (MA)

Expressions of buying and selling in Tunisian Arabic: A cognitive semantic account

FLSHS

January 2007

12

Faycel Dakhlaoui (MA)

Food metaphors in Tunisian Arabic proverbs: A cognitive account

FLAH

May 2007

13

Houda Slim (MA)

Hedging in students’ academic writing: Effect of instruction and awareness raising

FLAH

June 2007

14

Fatma Belaid (Ph.D.)

The effects of training and practice in peer- and self-feedback techniques on the writing performance and attitude towards writing in English of second year Tunisian students

FLAH

January 2007

15

Sana Gargouri Melki (MA)

A cognitive-pragmatic perspective on ironic commentaries in Tunisian newspapers

ISLT

July 2007

 

Participation in MA and Ph.D. viva voce

 

 

Type of research

Research topic

Role

Institution

Date of defense

1

MA (C.A.R)

The notional-functional syllabus and the Tunisian context (Adel Khadraoui)

Main reader

FLAH

1993

2

MA (C.A.R)

The suitability of “Communicate in English, Level three, to Tunisian learners (Salwa M’rabet)

Main reader

FLAH

1993

3

MA

Modality as a  pragmalinguistic tool in legal/political discourse: Clinton’s grand jury testimony in Lewinsky’s affair as a case study (Ridha Lamouchi)

Main reader

ISLT

2002

4

MA

The process of copywriting in promotional discourse: The impact of research on print advertising language (a content analysis) (Samira Allani)

Main reader

ISLT

2002

5

MA

The role of humour in persuasion in Tunisian TV commercials as a discourse type (Ridha Arfi)

Main reader

ISLT

2003

6

MA

ESP students’ writing strategies (Olfa Bayoudh)

Main reader

ISLT

2003

7

MA

The dialectics of ideological framing and representation in the Internet news: Towards a systematic critical discourse analysis of media language (Samira Farhat)

Main reader

ISLT

2003

8

 

Anaphorisation semantique et emphatisation dans le texte publicitaire (Lamia Guelloub)

Main reader

ISLT

2003

9

MA

The manipulation of person deixis in the Bush administration’s political discourses: An experientialist approach (Nadia Bousaid)

Main reader

ISLT

2003

10

MA

Understanding speech acts in Victorian society: The flouting of the relation maxim in Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest (Aouatef Boubakri)

Main reader

ISLT

2004

11

MA

Modifying illocutionary forces as a goal-oriented strategy in political discourse: George W. Bush’s speeches between 9/11 and 11-30-2001 as a case study (Nadia Abid)

Main reader

ISLT

2004

12

MA

Person deixis as a pragmalinguistic tool in political discourse: A critical discourse analysis of Bush’s speeches concerning waging a war on Iraq (Zied Ben Amor)

Main reader

ISLT

2004

13

MA

Pronominals as indicators of socio-political affiliation: Reading through Arafat and Sharon’s speeches

Main reader

ISLT

2004

14

MA

مقاربة عرفانية للإستعارة في كتاب "ذاكرة الجسد" لأحلام المستغانمي (الطالبة بسمة السوداني)

Main reader

ISLT

2005

15

 

MA

L1 and L2 ambiguity resolution of relative clauses: The case of TA and TA learners of English and French (Anis Balti)

Chair

FLAH

December 2005

16

MA

Understanding Speech Acts in Victorian Society: The flouting of the relation maxim in Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest (Aouatef Boubakri)

Main reader

ISLT

June 2005

17

MA

Common errors in the use of prepositions in the written work of Audiovisual students at the Institut Superieur des Arts Multimedia (Foued Balti Toueti)

Main reader

ISLT

June 2005

18

MA

المعنى والإحالة في علم الدلالة العرفاني (الطالب ياسين البوزيدي)

Main reader

FLAH

March 2006

19

MA

Topicalization and left dislocation: A comparative study between English and Standard Arabic (Maha Haj Alayya)

Chair

FLAH

January 2006

20

MA

Reliability of the principles-and parameters theory in the light of comprehension/reading strategies used by Tunisian bilingual learners of English (Aida Zitouni)

Chair

FLAH

May 2006

21

MA

The use of verb subcategorization in the processing of Tunisian Arabic (Kamal Labidi)

Chair

FLAH

May 2006

22

MA

Business news reporting in the Financial Times: A socio-rhetorical study (Nedra Cherif)

Main reader

ISLT

November 2006

23

Ph.D.

Analysis of English and Modern Standard Arabic Complement sentences (Souad Fertani Ben Nasr)

Member

FLAH

January 2006

24

MA

Business news reporting in the financial times: A socio-rhetorical study

Main reader

ISLT

2006

25

Ph.D.

Classroom spoken discourse: A study of verbal interaction in Tunisian EFL secondary school lessons (Salwa M’rabet-Abid)

Member

FLAH

November 2006

26

MA

Emerging types of computer-mediated texts: The case of SMS text messages (Hassen Rabhi)

Chair

FLAH

April 2007

27

MA

Is that funny? Humor and irony from a cognitive-pragmatic perspective: Al-Jahiz’s Al bukhalaa as a case study (Aulaya Fourati Chaabane) 

Main reader

FLAH

April 2007

28

MA

Demystifying deception: Unsolicited electronic messages (SPAMS) as a case study (Aida Najeh)

Main reader

FLAH

April 2007

29

MA

The discourse of political advertising: An analysis of print advertisements in the American presidential election 2004 (Zied Brahmia)

Chair

FLAH

June 2007

30

MA

Narratorial techniques in Tunisian police and court transcripts: A forensic linguistic approach (Nesrine Triki)

Main reader

FLAH

June 2007

31

Ph.D.

Visual metaphor as indirect claim: An interactive approach to persuasion in TV car advertising (Hassen Souissi)

 

Main reader

FLAH

July 2007

32

Ph.D.

A comparative sociolinguistic study of gender- related differences and attitudes in the use of Standard Arabic Speech forms in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (Manal Abdullah Ismail)

Member

College of Arts, Department of English, KSU

June 2008

33

Ph.D.

A linguistic study of narrative discourse in twenty chosen sayings of the Prophet Muhammad peace be upon him: A micro-macro structural approach (Salma Ali Dhafer Al-Qahtani)

 

Member

College of Education, Abha

2009

 

Journal referees

 

 

 

Journal/Book

Title of the paper

Author’s name

1

Journal of Philosophy (based in South Africa)

Metaphor and Sentence Meaning

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

2

Perspectives on Arabic Linguistics XVI (Papers from the 16th annual Symposium on Arabic Linguistics, Cambridge, March 2002, Cambridge University). Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2006.  

The textual component in classical Arabic: Investigating information structure

Salwa A. Kamel (Egypt)

3

Metaphor & Symbol (based in Mahwah, New Jersey)

Grouping, Simile, and Oxymoron in Pictures: A Design-based Cognitive Approach

Norman Teng and Sun Sewen

(Taiwan)

4

Humor (based in the USA) 

Egyptian Humor: A Pragmatic Analysis of Selected Social and Political Cartoons

Omnia F. El Kommos (Egypt)

5

International Journal of Arabic and English Studies, IJAES (based in Amman, Jordan)

Attention, Noticing and Foreign Language Behavior: Focus on Attending to Form and Content in Written Texts and Correction Tasks

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

6

International Journal of Arabic and English Studies, IJAES (based in Amman, Jordan)

Bilingual Acquisition, Development and Performance

 

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

7

International Journal of Arabic and English Studies, IJAES (based in Amman, Jordan)

The ‘Explicitation Hypothesis’ and Non-professional Translators: A Case Study

 

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

8

Cognitive Linguistics

Universal processes in conceptual metaphor: A recommendation for a usage-based approach

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

9

Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Across Disciplines Online (CADAAD Online)

Disease metaphors in urban planning

 

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

10

Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Across Disciplines Online (CADAAD Online)

Discourse and identity: Lakoff’s Cognitive Linguistics and why it isn’t

 

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

11

Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Across Disciplines Online (CADAAD Online)

Distancing and showing solidarity via metaphor and metonymy in political discourse: A critical study of American statements on Iraq during the years 2004-2005

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

12

Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Across Disciplines Online (CADAAD Online)

Under construction:  Images of the enlarging EU in the Australasian news media

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

13

International Journal of Arabic and English Studies, IJAES (based in Amman, Jordan)

The Effect of Computer-Based Deductive and Inductive Instruction on the Acquisition of Verb Tenses in an EFL Context

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

14

Humor (based in the USA) 

Humor in the Collectivist Arab Middle East: The Case of Lebanon

Shahe S. Kazarian

15

Journal of Pragmatics

Date-palms, Language and the Power of Knowledge: An Analysis of a Fable from Kalila and Dimna

Bahaa-Eddin M. Mazid

16

Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Across Disciplines Online (CADAAD Online)

What can Critical Metaphor Analysis add to the understanding of racist ideology? Recent studies of Hitler’s anti-Semitic metaphors

Andreas Musolff

 

17

Journal of Linguistic Anthropology

You Are What You Speak?: Language Ideology and Heteroglossia in Tunisia

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

18

International Journal of Arabic and English Studies, IJAES (based in Amman, Jordan)

A Critical Review of Two Admission Tests

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

19

Cognitive Linguistics

 

The bird of time has but a little way To fly__and Lo! The Bird is on the wing:                   

Metaphors of time in Poems of the Persian Poet Omar Khayyam

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

20

Sayyab Translation Journal

Lexical Gaps in Arabic-to­-English Translation

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

21

Pragmatics and Cognition

Translating phatic expressions

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

22

Linguistik Online

Phases in L1 Acquisition of Negation: A comparative study of Cairene Arabic and English

 

Author’s name masked for blind reviewing

 

 

 

Professional membership

 

  1. Member of PALA (Poetics And Linguistics Association)
  2. Founding Member of RaAM International Association (Researching and Applying Metaphor)
  3. Member of IGEL (International Society for the Empirical Study of Literature)
  4. Member of CADAAD (Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Across Disciplines)
  5. Member of the editorial board of Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Across Disciplines Online (CADAAD Online). 
  6. Member of the scientific committee of the Seventh international Conference on Researching and Applying Metaphor (RaAM 7)
  7. Member of the scientific committee of the Eighth international Conference on Researching and Applying Metaphor (RaAM 8)
  8. Member of the Editorial Board of STJ as of 2008 (Sayyab Translation Journal, based in London)
  9. Member of the Editorial Board of John Benjamins’ book series, Cognitive Linguistic Studies in Cultural Contexts (edited by Ning Yu and Farzad Sharifian) since its inception in 2010

 

Research interests

 

Metaphor

Critical Metaphor Analysis

Cognitive Poetics

Cognitive Linguistics

(Cognitive) Pragmatics

(Critical) Discourse Analysis

Translation studies

 

Awards

 

Senior Fulbright Award (2002-2003) spent at the Department of Linguistics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque (USA).

 

Scientific Activities

 

·         Participation in the selection and assessment of one textbook for English in secondary education titled, Spread Your Wings (1998)

·         Participation in the foundation of ELTecs for the Middle East and North Africa (under British Council sponsorship, Morocco, March 2000).

·         Organization of the Fourth International Conference on Researching and Applying Metaphor (RAAM IV): Metaphor, Cognition, and Culture. Faculty of Arts, Manouba, Tunis, 5-7 April, 2001.

·         Member of the Scientific Board of the Sixth Researching and Applying Metaphor Conference (RAAM VI) held in Leeds (10-12 April 2006).

  • Member of the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Arabic and English Studies (IJAES) (2006)
  • Member of the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Proverbs (2006).
  • Member of the Editorial Board of the Online Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Across Disciplines Online (CADAAD Online) at http://discourse.uea.ac.uk (2006)
  • Member of the Scientific Board of the Seventh Researching and Applying Metaphor Conference (RAAM VI) held in Cáceres, Spain (29-31 May 2008).

·         Participation as a coordinator in two committees to re-orientate students to the Department of European Languages and Translation, College of Languages and Translation, King Saud University (2007-8)

·         Participation in the Committee for Output of Colleges and Departments of Translation as a coordinator of the Educational Curricula sub-committee, College of Languages and Translation, King Saud University (2008)

·         Participation as a coordinator of the Review Committee for the curricula of the Departments of Linguistics and Translation, College of Languages and Translation, King Saud University (2008)

·         Participation as a member in three recruiting and promotion committees at the College of Languages and Translation, King Saud University (2008)

·         Participation as a member in the French Follow-up Committee for the Masters Degree in Translation at the College of Languages and Translation, King Saud University (2008)

·         Participation in the writing of no less than 15 course descriptions for the newly-created Department of Linguistics and Restructuring of the College of Languages and Translation, King Saud University (2008)

·         Participation as an external examiner of a Ph.D. dissertation at the Department of English, College of Arts, King Saud University (title: "A Comparative Sociolinguistic Study of gender-related Differences and Attitudes in the Use of Standard Arabic Speech Forms in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia") (June 2008)

·         Presentation of an invited talk at the College of Languages and Translation, King Saud University (title: "A Cognitive-pragmatics of Categories and Translation: Prototypes and Frame Semantics"  (2008)

 

Community Service

 

·         Post-editing the following Saudi National Society for Human Rights translations:

 

o   First Report on the National Society for Human Rights: Its Culture, Vision, Mission, Objectives, and Accomplishments (2004, 2005, 2006)

o   Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp and Human Rights Violations: Suffering of Saudi Detainees and their Families

 

·         Translating the following Saudi National Society for Human Rights document:

 

    • Conformity of Saudi laws and regulations with basic human rights conventions                            

o   Cancelling the laws of sponsorship and redressing the employer-expatriate employee relation

    • Rights of the suspect (during arrest, investigation, search, trial)
    • Code of criminal procedure

o   First Report on Human Rights Conditions in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (2006)

    • Second report on the status of human rights in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (2008)
    • Rights and duties of male and  female inmates (2008)

 

·         Linguistic editing of papers on dietetics (garlic, ginger, cigarette smoking) and accounting (Saudi Association for Accounting)

 

·         Co-translating the following documents for the Ministry of Higher Education (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia):

o   Higher Education  in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: International Indicators and Comparisons

o   Ministry of Higher Education's Plan to Accomplish Excellence in Science and Technology in Higher Education

 

Computer Skills

 

§  Expert command of word processing using Word, Word Perfect, and Lotus Word Pro

§  Expert command of Internet and Computer Technology in Research

§  Expert command of PowerPoint writing and presenting

§  Medium command of SPSS for empirical research

§  Medium command of online concordances for empirical research

 

 
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