Lower vitamin D status is more common among Saudi adults with diabetes mellitus type 1 than in non-diabetics

Journal Article
, Al-Daghri NM, Al-Attas OS, Alokail MS, Alkharfy KM, Yakout SM, Aljohani NJ, Al Fawaz H, Al-Ajlan AS, Sheshah ES, Al-Yousef M, Alharbi M. . 2014
Publication Work Type: 
PHD
Tags: 
Vitamin D; Vitamin D Deficiency; Type 1 diabetes
Magazine \ Newspaper: 
BMC Public Health
Volume Number: 
11;14(1)
Pages: 
15
Publication Abstract: 

Background

Vitamin D deficiency is an increasingly recognized comorbidity in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DMT1), suggesting that vitamin D deficiency might play a role in DMT1. We aimed to determine and compare the vitamin D status of Saudi adults with and without DMT1.

Methods

A total of 60 Saudi adults with DMT1 from the Diabetes Clinics and 60 non-DM, healthy controls were included in the study. The mean age for those with DMT1 was 25.9 ± 16.1 years versus 36.7 ± 3.6 years among the controls. We measured serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD), calcium, cholesterol, blood glucose, HDL, and triglycerides and compared the results between the DMT1 group and control subjects.

Results

Both the DMT1 and healthy groups had vitamin D deficiency. The mean levels of 25OHD were significantly lower in the DMT1 adults than in the controls (28.1 ± 1.4 nmol/L versus 33.4 ± 1.6 nmol/L). In the DMT1 adults, 66.7% were mildly, 31.7% moderately, and 3.3% severely vitamin D deficient as compared with 41.7% (mildly), 31.7% (moderately), and 5% (severely) in the control group. Overall, 100% of the DMT1 adults and 78% of the healthy children were vitamin D deficient.

Conclusion

The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among DMT1 adults was relatively high. Therefore, screening for vitamin D deficiency and supplementation for this population should be warranted.