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Guidelines_English_Final
تحميل الدليل التدريبي

أسئلة شائعة


 

 

Course Title (Symbol and No.): 121 ANAT           Human Anatomy (1)

 

Credit Hours:                               7 (3+4)

 

Contact Hours:                             Theoretical:                    3

 

                                                        Tutorials & Practical:   4

 

Summary of Course Contents

1.     Introduction to medical terminology, osteology, myology, arthrology, angiology.

2.     Gross morphology of upper and lower limbs with clinically relevant information on nerve injuries.

3.     Gross anatomy of cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems with clinically relevant information on certain important subjects in the thorax and abdomen.

 

Course Objectives

A. General Objectives

          The course is designed to introduce the student to:

a)     Medical terminology and methods used in gathering information.

b)    Basic tissues of the body and how they are integrated to form functional units.

c)     The correlation between structure and function.

d)    The relevance of anatomy to medicine.

 

B. Specific Objectives

a) The detailed structure of the bones, muscles, nerves, blood vessels, joints and lymphatics of the upper and lower limbs.

b) The morphological and functional relationship between the limbs and the rest of the body with emphasis on hand function and locomotion.

c) The effects of nerve injuries on sensation and functions of the upper and lower limbs.

d) The structure of the rib cage, wall of the thorax and diaphragm.

e) The structure and function of the heart and lungs.

f) The mechanism of respiration.

g) Blood supply, innervation and lymphatic drainage of the thorax.

h) The structure and function of the vertebral column.

i) The gross anatomy and function of the abdominal viscera.

j) Blood supply, innervation and lymphatic drainage of the abdominal viscera.

k) The gross morphology and function of the pelvic viscera and perineum.

l) Pelvic innervation, with emphasis on pelvic autonomic plexuses.

m) Blood supply and lymphatic drainage of pelvis and perineum.

n) Oeteology of pelvis.

 

C. Terminal Objectives

          At the end of the course, the student should be able to:

a)     Use anatomical terms both in oral as well as in written description.

b)    Describe the structural components of limbs, thoracic and abdominal walls, heart and cardiovascular system, respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital system, axial and appendicular skeleton.

c)     Correlate the various structures of the various systems with their functions.

d)    Discuss the effect of nerve and vascular injury on structure and function.

 

Instructional Strategies

i)       Didactic Lectures

          Lectures are given on selected topics.

ii)      Tutorials

Pre-selected topics are discussed in a more informal setting. Active student participation is encouraged in these sessions.

iii)     Practical Sessions

Dissection of relevant regions or demonstration of prosected material with discussions.

iv)     Use of Department Resource Materials for Student-centered Learning

          Students are encouraged to use the wide collection of resource material provided by the Department for self-learning. These include:

a)     A well-equipped anatomy museum.

b)    A large collection of 2’’x2’’ projection slides.

c)     Video-tapes and CDs on topographic anatomy and guides to dissection.

d)    Computers and scanners available in the museum.

e)     Articulated and non-articulated bones.

f)      Sections of adult human body embedded in plastic resin.

 

Course Contents

I.       General Anatomy (1 week)

          1. Anatomical terminology.

2. Introduction to the study of anatomy of bones, joints, muscles,   nerves and blood vessels.

 

II.      Anatomy of the limbs

          A.      Theory

                   I- Upper limb (6 weeks)

                   1) Bones of upper limb.

                   2) Pectoral region an axilla.

                   3) Scapular region.

4) First and second layers of muscles of back.

5) Upper arm.

6) Forearm.

7) Hand.

II- Lower limb (5 weeks)

1)     Bones of lower limb.

2)     Thigh

3)     Leg.

4)     Foot.

 

B.      Tutorials

          I- Upper limb

          1) General features of bones of upper limb.

          2) Movements of joints of upper limb,

3) Nerve injuries and anatomical basis of the methods used in testing for them.

4) Radiology and sections.

5) Problem-based learning.

II- Lower limb

1) General features of bones of lower limb.

          2) Movements of joints of lower limb,

3) Nerve injuries and anatomical basis of the methods used in testing for them.

4) Arches of foot.

5) Radiology and sections.

 6) Problem-based learning.

 

C.               Practical

I- Upper limb

                   1) Bones of upper limb.

                   2) Pectoral region an axilla.

                   3) Scapular region.

4) First and second layers of muscles of back.

5) Upper arm.

6) Forearm.

7) Hand.

II- Lower limb

1)     Bones of lower limb.

2)     Thigh

3)     Leg.

4)     Foot.

 

 

III.    Anatomy of the respiaratory system (2 weeks)

          A.      Theory

                   1) Bones of thoracic cage.

                   2) Thoracic wall.

                   3) Pleura and lungs.

 

B.               Tutorials

1)     Surface anatomy of pleura and lung.

2)     Radiology and sections.

3)     Joints of the thorax and mechanism of respiration.

4)     Problem-based learning.

 

C.               Practical

1) Bones of thoracic cage.

                   2) Thoracic wall.

                   3) Pleura and lungs.

 

IV.     Anatomy of the cardiovascular system (1 week)

A.               Theory

1)     Pericardium and Heart.

2)     Mediastinum

 

B.               Tutorials

1)     Surface anatomy of heart and valves.

2)     Radiology and sections.

3)     Problem-based learning.

 

C.      Practical

1)     Pericardium and Heart.

2) Mediastinum

 

V.      Anatomy of the gastrointestinal system (6 weeks)

          A.      Theory

                   1) Anterior abdominal wall.

                   2) Peritoneum.

                   3) Stomach.

                   4) Small intestine.

                   5) Large intestine.

                   6) Liver, pancreas and spleen.

                   7) Blood vessels.

 

          B.      Tutorials

                   1) Abdominal incisions.

                   2) Hernia.    

                   3) Peritoneal spaces.

                   4) Portal circulation and porto-systemic anastomosis.

                   5) Problem-based learning.

                   6) Radiology and sections.

 

C.               Practical

1) Anterior abdominal wall.

                   2) Peritoneum.

                   3) Stomach.

                   4) Small intestine.

                   5) Large intestine.

                   6) Liver, pancreas and spleen.

                   7) Blood vessels.

 

 

 

 

VI.     Anatomy of genitourinary system (4 weeks)

A.               Theory

1)     Posterior abdominal wall: muscles, vessels and nerves.

2)     Lumbar vertebrae.

3)     Kidneys and ureters.

4)     Bony pelvis.

5)     Pelvic wall: muscles, vessels and nerves.

6)     Male and female pelvic viscera.

7)     Perineum: urogenital and anal triangles.

 

B.               Tutorials

1)     Pelvic diaphragm.

2)     Differences between male and female bony pelvis.

3)     Radiology and sections.

4)     Problem-based learning.

 

C.               Practical

1)     Posterior abdominal wall: muscles, vessels and nerves.

2)     Lumbar vertebrae.

3)     Kidneys and ureters.

4)     Bony pelvis.

5)     Pelvic wall: muscles, vessels and nerves.

6)     Male and female pelvic viscera.

7)     Perineum: urogenital and anal triangles.

 

Recommended Books

1)     Clinical Anatomy: R.S. Snell

2)     Cunninghams Manual of Practical Anatomy: G.J. Romanes.

3)     Grant’s Atlas of Anatomy: Anne M.R. Agur and Ming J. Lee.

 

Distribution of Marks (Total 100 marks)

A.               First Semester                                             35 marks

1) One Quiz                                                 5 marks

2) First Continuous Assessment Exam          15 marks

3) Mid-year Exam                                        20 marks

B.               Second Semester                                         25 marks

1) One Quiz                                                 5 marks

2) Third Continuous Assessment Exam         15 marks

          C.      Final Exam                                                         40 marks

Examination Format in Continuous Assessment Exams

          A.      Written Exam               

                   The exam will be in the form of 30 questions

(One single best answer)                    

 

Time                              One hour

 

B.      Practical Exam            

          The exam will be in the form of 20 spots (either flesh or bone).

          Time                              Half a minute for each spot

 

Examination Format in Final Exam

          A.      Written Exam

                   The exam will be in the form of 60 questions

(One single best answer)                    

Time                              Two hours

 

B.      Practical Exam   

          The exam will be in the form of 20 spots (either flesh or bone).

                   Time                              Half a minute for each spot

 

Examination Format in each Quiz (only written exam, in the 5th week of each semester)

                    The exam will be in the form of 8 questions

(One single best answer)                    

 

Time                              Two minutes for each question

 

 

Topics for Written Exams

A.               First Continuous Assessment Exam

The exam includes all topics studied from the beginning of the academic year till the week before the time of exam.

 

          B.      Second Continuous Assessment (Mid-year) Exam

                   The exam includes:

                   1) Topics included in the First Continuous Exam    (one-third)

                   2) Topics studied after the First Continuous Exam  (Two-thirds)

 

C.               Third Continuous Assessment Exam

The exam includes all topics studied from the beginning of the second semester till the week before the time of exam.

 

D.               Final Exam

The exam includes all topics studied during the whole course:

1) Topics studied during the first semester              (30%)

2) Topics studied during the second semester         (70%)

 

ELIGIBILITY FOR FINAL EXAM

·        FOR FRESH STUDENTS: Attendance must not be less than 70%

·        FOR REPEATERS: Attendance must not be less than 50%

 

Resit Exams                                                       

A.               For Final exam                      100 marks

1)       Written Exam                 

It has the same format and topics of Final Exam.

                   2)       Practical Exam               

It has the same format and topics of Final Exam.

         

B.               For Continuous exam or quizzes

1)       Format:

The Resit Exam will be in the form of essay written questions.

2)       Policy:

- The student who did not attend the original exam must apply an appeal to the Chairman of Anatomy Department within a week from the time of the exam.

- Resit Exam will be held only for students whose appeal was accepted by the Department of Anatomy.

 

 

 

N.B.: Dr. Ahmed Fathalla will be happy to meet any student who needs help at:

·       Saturday: from 1 to 3 PM

·       Tuesday: from 1 to 3 PM

 

 
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