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Guidelines_English_Final
تحميل الدليل التدريبي

أسئلة شائعة


 

SAUDI COMMISSION FOR HEALTH SPECIALTIES

 

Saudi Specialty Certificate Program in

Orthodontics

(SSCPO)

 

1

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Page

 

I. Introduction …………………………………………………………

II. Objectives …………………………………………………………

iii. Training Centers ………………….…………………………………...

IV. Admission Requirements …………………………………………

V. Program Description .………………………………………………...

A. Basic Sciences……………..………………..……………………….

a. First-Year (R1)…………. ……………………………….………

b. Second-Year (R2)………………………………………………..

c. Third-Year (R3)…………………………………………..……...

d. Fourth-Year (R4)…………………………………………..…….

e. Fifth Year (R5)…………………………………………..………

B. Specialty Training…..……………………………………………….

a. First-Year (R1)……….…………………………………………..

1. Lectures ………………………………………………………

2. Book Review ………………………………………………..

3. Journal Club …………………………………………………

4. Orthodontic Technique ………………………………………

5. Orthodontic Diagnostic Procedures……………………………

6. Orthodontic Clinic …………………………………………..

b. Second to Fifth Year (R2 – R5) ………………………

1. Advanced Orthodontic Seminars ……………………………..

2. Journal Club …………………………………………………

3. Monthly Case Presentation …………………………………..

4. Annual Resident’s Lecture …………………………………..

5. Orthodontic Clinic …………………………………………..

VI. Evaluation …………………………………………………………..

A. Annual Evaluation …………………………………………………

B. Part I Examination …………………………………………………..

C. Part II Examination …………………………………………………..

a. Written Examination ……………………………………………..

b. Clinical/Oral Examination ………………………………………..

D. Program Evaluation ………………………………………………….

VII. Admission of Candidates with Previous Formal Post-Graduate

Training in Orthodontics to the Program ………………………............

VIII. Certification ……………………………………………………………

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I. INTRODUCTION

 

The Saudi Specialty Certificate Program in Orthodontics (SSCPO) is a 5-year clinical

training program in the field of orthodontics approved by the Saudi Commission for

Health Specialties (SCHS). Candidates who are accepted into the program undergo

intensive didactic and clinical orthodontic training.

 

II. OBJECTIVES

 

The goal of the Saudi Specialty Certificate Program in Orthodontics is to train qualified

dentists to be capable of assuming their role as competent clinicians in the field of

orthodontics. This program prepares the residents to:

 

Plan and provide simple and complex orthodontic treatment for a wide variety

of malocclusions and dentofacial deformities.

 

Acquire competence in clinical orthodontic disciplinary care of patients.

 

Make wise clinical judgments in arriving at diagnosis, treatment planning and

assessment of treatment outcomes.

 

Keep abreast and apply latest technology in orthodontics and practice

management.

 

Communicate, understand and function effectively with other health care

professionals and understand the setting of their organizational system.

 

Acquire adequate experience in teaching and research to upgrade their clinical

knowledge and skills.

 

III. TRAINING CENTERS

 

The Saudi Specialty Certificate Program in Orthodontics can be hosted by an institution

or a center, which has an overall administrative control and responsibility for conducting

the program. Governmental or private centers can be accepted for training after being

evaluated and accredited by the SCHS as either a full training center or a partial training

center. Full training center shall possess all the necessary resources and facilities to fulfill

the educational requirements of the program, while a partial training center lacks one or

more of the resources required for fulfillment of all the program requirements. An

accreditation committee carries out the recognition process according to the classification

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standards and rules set by the SCHS. The following are some of the general guidelines

concerning the accreditation of a training center:

 

Center must provide a readily accessible facility for dental treatment.

 

Center must provide sufficient resources, including qualified staff and

equipments, to conduct intended training for the residents.

 

Partial training center must supplement its resources through affiliation with

other centers or institutions. Affiliated centers must also be recognized by

SCHS.

 

Residents must have privileges and responsibilities in the training center similar

to those of in-house residents.

 

IV. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

 

Applicants who fulfill the following requirements are eligible for admission in the Saudi

Specialty Certificate Program in Orthodontics:

 

Bachelor of Dental Surgery Degree (BDS) or equivalent from a recognized

University.

 

Successful completion of one-year Internship Program in General Dentistry or

equivalent as set forth by the rules of SCHS.

 

Provide at least two recommendation letters.

 

Provide an approval letter from a Sponsor that the applicant can be in full-time

training for the entire 5-years duration of the program.

 

Full registration in the SCHS as a resident.

 

Payment of application and assigned training fees.

 

Sign an obligation agreement to abide by the rules and regulations of the SCHS

and the SSCPO.

 

Pass the competitive selection process as set by the SCHS and the specialty

admission committee.

 

V. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

 

The Saudi Specialty Certificate Program in Orthodontics extends for a period of five

years in which the didactic orthodontic knowledge is integrated with the clinical training

for the entire program duration.

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The following is a list of the recommended basic science courses, orthodontic topics, and

clinical requirements of the program:

 

A. Basic Sciences

 

A number of basic science crash courses are offered to the residents at each level of

the program. These courses are intended to broaden the knowledge foundation of

the residents on various basic science topics and how they relate to the field of

orthodontics.

 

a. First-Year (R1):

 

1. Advanced Oral Biology (R1)

 

Lectures on this topic cover the development of the face, microanatomy of the bone

and hard dental tissues, oral mucous membrane, periodontium and salivary glands.

In addition, lectures cover various oral and dental structures, their functions,

relationship and response to systemic and environmental influences.

 

2. Applied Head and Neck Anatomy (R1)

 

Topics reviewed highlight salient anatomical structures of the head and neck as

applied to dentistry to reflect significant clinical considerations. Topics also

include but are not limited to; facial skeleton, muscles of the face and mastication,

the mouth, oropharynx and larynx, blood vessels, lymphatic and nerve supply of the

oral cavity and salivary glands.

 

3. Embryology (R1)

 

The course offers an in-depth study of the embryogenesis of tissues, organs and

structures of the craniofacial region.

 

4. Oral Pathology (R1)

 

This course deals with the pathology of the jaws and contiguous soft tissues and

their involvement in various systemic diseases.

 

5. Microbiology, Immunology and Infection Control (R1)

 

This didactic course covers topics in microbiology and immunology which explain

oral pathological conditions including bacterial, viral and mycotic infections of the

oral cavity.

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b. Second-Year (R2):

 

1. Biostatistics (R2)

 

Topics covered include variables, frequency distribution, sampling measure of

central tendency, variance and measures of dispersion, various statistical tests,

analysis and probability.

 

2. Craniofacial Growth and Development (R2)

 

This course provides knowledge regarding different developmental periods,

standards of growth and development, methods for study of craniofacial growth,

skeletal morphogenesis and growth principles, growth of the craniofacial complex,

development of cleft lip and palate, and development of dentition.

 

3. Biomechanics in Orthodontics (R2)

 

This course is intended to guide the residents into proper application of the basic

fundamentals of mechanics towards efficient treatment mechanotherapy.

 

4. Biomaterials (R2)

 

This course provides the residents with knowledge and understanding necessary to

properly select and manipulate various dental and orthodontic materials.

 

c. Third-Year (R3):

 

1. Genetics (R3)

 

Molecular biology of genes, cytogenetics, mechanisms of inheritance, inheritance

of malocclusion, dental anomalies, craniofacial syndromes and medical genetics

will be covered during this course.

 

2. Advanced Topics in Oral Medicine and Diagnosis (R3)

 

The resident will be provided with an integrated and comprehensive understanding

of oral diseases and their management.

 

3. Occlusion (Craniomandibular Dysfunction) (R3)

 

Topics on stomatognathic physiology and craniomandibular dysfunction are

covered.

 

4. Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (R3)

 

This course provides knowledge about radiation physics, radiation biology, hazards

and protection, advanced imaging techniques and diagnostic oral and maxillofacial

radiology.

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d. Fourth-Year (R4):

 

1. Child Psychology (R4)

 

Psychology development from infancy through early adulthood will be described

with greater emphasis placed on application of this information to clinical health

care delivery services.

 

2. Research Methods and Scientific Writing (R4)

 

The objective of this course is to teach the residents different methods of research

design, ethical aspects of research on animals and humans, and to educate them on

writing scientific papers and reports.

 

3. Educational Methods (R4)

 

The aim of this course is to expose the residents to the methods of teaching and

learning. Topics include the nature of learning and teaching, curriculum

development, instructional objectives, instructional media, audio-visual teaching

and learning aids, and assessment methods for knowledge, skills and attitude.

 

e. Fifth-Year (R5):

 

1. General Epidemiology (R5)

 

Principles and methods in the study of the distribution and determinants of diseases

in human populations are taught in this course. Topics covered include: statistical

measures used in epidemiology, methods for organizing epidemiological data,

disease surveillance, and investigations of disease outbreaks.

 

2. Practice Management (R5)

 

The following topics are covered in this course: management of auxiliaries and

other office personnel, maintenance and management of patient records, quality

assessment and quality assurance, principles of peer review, business management

including an understanding of third party payment and professional practice

development, infection control, environmental health management, principles of

professional ethics, and alternative health care delivery systems.

 

B. Specialty Training

 

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The orthodontic specialty training consists of a comprehensive pre-clinical

preparation, lectures in various orthodontic topics, and clinical training on the

management of a wide variety of malocclusions and dentofacial deformities. Before

getting exposed to the clinical experience, first-year residents are expected to

comprehend various orthodontic diagnostic procedures and to be able to formulate

an acceptable orthodontic treatment plan for different types of malocclusion.

Intensive wire-bending and typodont exercises during the preclinical preparation

period enhance the manual skills of the residents required to provide a proper

orthodontic therapy. During their second to fifth year of the program, the residents

continue to provide quality orthodontic care to their patients guided by wellqualified

clinical instructors, along with a continuous academic curriculum to

ensure exposure of the residents to wide range of orthodontic topics and knowledge

update.

 

a. First-Year (R1):

 

First-year residents are gradually introduced to clinical orthodontics through a

comprehensive preparatory education in the format of lectures, book reviews,

literature review seminars, and a wide range of orthodontic laboratory exercises.

 

1. Lectures

 

The following orthodontic topics will be covered by senior staff members during

the first-year residency of the program:

1. Craniofacial growth and development

2. Development of the dentition

3. Classification and etiology of malocclusion

4. Malocclusal problems

5. Class I malocclusion

6. Class II Div 1 malocclusion

7. Class II Div 2 malocclusion

8. Class III malocclusion

9. Timing of orthodontic treatment

10. Treatment in the early and mixed dentition

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11. Orthodontic treatment planning (multi-disciplinary approach)

12. Review of orthodontic brackets and fixed orthodontic appliances

13. Removable and Functional Appliances

14. Biology of tooth movement

15. Adverse effects of orthodontic treatment

 

2. Book Review

 

Residents are required to present selected chapters from major orthodontic

textbooks. The following books are recommended:

1. Proffit WR, Fields HW. Contemporary Orthodontics. (latest edition).

2. Graber TM, Vanarsdall RL, Vig KW. Orthodontics: Current Principle and

Techniques, (latest edition).

3. Bishara SE. Textbook of Orthodontics. (latest edition).

4. McNamara JA, Brudon WL. Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. (latest

edition).

 

3. Journal Club

 

Residents are required to assess and present selected articles from the most recent

orthodontic literature. Recommended orthodontic journals are:

 

American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics

 

European Journal of Orthodontics

 

Angle Orthodontist

 

Seminars in Orthodontics

 

Journal of Clinical Orthodontics

 

4. Orthodontic Technique

 

During their first year, residents will be trained on the design and construction of

various laboratory orthodontic appliances. Also, residents will learn how to take

proper dental impressions and how to produce orthodontic study models. In

addition, residents will be instructed and guided through comprehensive wire

bending exercises and a typodont course on orthodontic banding and bonding will

be conducted.

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5. Orthodontic Diagnostic Procedures

 

The objective of this series of lectures, seminars, and practical sessions is to expose

the first-year residents to various orthodontic diagnostic measures including lateral

cephalometry (identification of landmarks, tracing procedure, different analyses and

interpretations, and superimposition techniques), posteroanterior cephalometry

(identification of landmarks, tracing, and different analyses), and model analysis

methods and techniques.

 

6. Orthodontic Clinic

 

Residents will be exposed to various orthodontic clinical procedures through

attachment to senior orthodontic specialists during regular clinical sessions. Also, a

short preclinical course will be conducted on the following procedures:

 

History taking and documentation

 

Orthodontic intra- and extra-oral photography and their interpretation

 

Requisition of appropriate diagnostic radiographs and their analysis

 

Orthodontic model analysis

 

Collective data evaluation and case diagnosis with a prioritized and individualized

listing of problems of the case

 

Establishment of an individualized list of treatment objectives and goals based on

the problem list and any special circumstances related to the case

 

Formulation of comprehensive treatment plan

Orthodontic clinical training is based on a multi-center approach and spreads over

the five years duration of the program. It is designed to train the residents on

clinical orthodontic diagnostic procedures and comprehensive orthodontic

treatment. Residents are required to treat a specified number of patients under the

guidance and supervision of clinical instructors at various centers. In addition to

transferred cases from graduating groups, each resident is assigned 40-45 new cases

to be treated during the entire period of the program. A variety of malocclusion

cases should be started by each resident in order to be exposed to the various types

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of malocclusion. Recommended categories of cases to be started by each resident

are as follows:

1. Interceptive treatment in the primary or mixed dentition

2. Growth modification

3. Class I malocclusion

4. Class II malocclusion

5. Class III malocclusion

6. Malocclusion with transverse discrepancy

7. Malocclusion with interdisciplinary treatment approach

8. Dentofacial deformity with combined orthodontic and orthognathic surgery

treatment approach

9. Cleft lip and palate

Residents should formulate complete diagnosis and treatment plan for each patient.

All Patients’ records should meet publication standards. Residents should prepare a

separate binder for each patient that contains the following:

a. All necessary initial radiographs. This includes any cephalometric, panoramic,

hand-wrist, bitewings, or periapical radiographs taken for the patient.

b. Standard initial orthodontic photographs consisting of nine shots (extra-oral

frontal repose, extra-oral frontal smile, extra-oral 45º frontal smile, extra-oral

profile, intra-oral frontal occlusion, intra-oral right occlusion, intra-oral left

occlusion, upper occlusal, lower occlusal).

c. Signed and approved work-up of the case by the case supervisor. Work-up

includes patient’s personal information, chief complaint, etiology of

malocclusion, dental and medical history, clinical examination findings,

photographic analysis, radiographic analysis, model analysis, diagnosis, problem

list, treatment objectives, and treatment plan.

d. Progress and/or final records and any work-up of the case in the middle or at the

end of treatment. All progress or final cephalometric radiographs should be

accompanied with proper superimposition and interpretation.

e. All patient’s personal data including medical and dental history should be

annually updated and documented.

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f. Any other requirement as dictated by the case supervisor or the training center.

In addition to the patient’s binder, study models of the case should be properly

stored and maintained. Models should be neatly trimmed and always be present

whenever the patient is seen. A logbook of clinical activities should always be

present to monitor patient’s treatment progress and compliance. Uncooperative

behavior by the patient including missing appointments or noncompliance with

instructions should be promptly documented and brought to the attention of the case

supervisor.

Residents are encouraged to attend and participate in the national and international

specialty meetings and continuous education activities. Also, residents are allowed

to visit other reputable orthodontic and specialized centers abroad for the purpose of

obtaining a new specialized experience in the field upon the recommendation and

approval of the Supervising Committee.

 

b. Second to Fifth Year (R2-R5):

 

Second- to fifth-year residents are grouped together in a weekly educational series

of seminars and monthly case presentations. Scientific interaction between residents

from different training levels during seminars and case presentation is intended to

encourage exchange of knowledge and clinical experience.

 

1. Advanced Orthodontic Seminars

 

Starting from the second through the fifth year of residency, a series of advanced

orthodontic seminars are conducted on a weekly and cyclic basis. Each session

represents a 3-hour-contact seminar supervised by a staff member where residents

are required to present and discuss selected articles or book chapters on a major

orthodontic topic. Topics and the recommended number of sessions assigned to

each topic are as follows:

 

TOPIC NO. OF

SESSIONS

1 Craniofacial Growth and Development / Development of the Dentition 4

2 Biology of Tooth Movement and Tissue Reaction 4

 

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3 Etiology of Malocclusion 2

4 Cephalometric Analysis and Superimposition 3

5 Diagnostic Procedures and Case Analysis 3

6 Early Interceptive Treatment / Eruption Guidance 3

7 Early Treatment of Class II & Class III / Dentofacial Orthopedics 3

8 Oral Habits and their Orthodontic Management 2

9 Adult Orthodontics and Multidisciplinary Treatment Approach 3

10 Mandibular Incisor Extraction 1

11 Extraction versus Non-Extraction Therapy 2

12 Bimaxillary Protrusion 1

13 Orthodontic Management of Transverse Problems / Maxillary Expansion &

SARME 3

14 Orthodontic Management of Vertical Problems / Deep Overbite and Anterior

Open Bite 3

15 Upper Airway / Sleep Apnea 2

16 Management of Upper Midline Diastema 1

17 Book Review: “Optimization of Orthodontic Elastics” by Langlade (latest edition) 5

18 Facial and Dental Esthetics / Smile Analysis 3

19 Management of Congenitally Missing Teeth 2

20 Orthodontic Management of Dental Anomalies 2

21 Orthodontic Management of Tongue Thrust Problem 1

22 Dental and Facial Asymmetries 2

23 Ectopic Maxillary Canine 1

24 Role of Third Molars and Late Mandibular Crowding 1

25 Occlusion and Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction 2

26 Orthognathic Surgery: Book Review “Contemporary Treatment of Dentofacial

Deformity” by Proffit, White, and Sarver (latest edition) 12

27 Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies 3

28 Orthodontic Management of Medically Compromised Patients 1

29 Retention and Stability 2

30 Temporary Anchorage Devices / Mini-implants and Mini-screws 2

31 Distraction Osteogenesis 2

32 Orthognathic Surgery: Literature Review 3

33 Root Resorption / Risks Associated with Orthodontic Treatment 2

34 3-D Imaging / Technology in the Orthodontic Office 2

35 Orthodontic Materials 3

36 Evidence-Based Orthodontic Practice 2

TOTAL 93

 

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2. Journal Club

 

Following every two orthodontic topics covered in the seminar series, a journal club

session is conducted. Two or three residents are requested to select one article each

from the most recent issue of major orthodontic journals and present it to the group

with his/her scientific critique of the article.

 

3. Monthly Case Presentation

 

Towards the end of each month, a session is allocated for case presentations. Each

case presentation should follow a specific high-standard format that is distributed to

the residents at the start of their second year of residency. All instructors from

different training centers are expected to attend the monthly case presentation

meetings.

 

4. Annual Resident’s Lecture

 

Each resident in the second- to the fifth-year level of residency is required to

prepare and present a 35-40 minutes annual scientific presentation on a selected

orthodontic topic. A hard copy of the lecture should be made available to all

attendants in a scientific paper-format during the time of the presentation.

 

5. Orthodontic Clinic

 

Residents of the second to the fifth level are assigned seven clinical sessions per

week. All clinical activities are supervised by qualified orthodontic instructors.

Residents are required to firmly adhere to the clinical rules and guidelines of each

training center.

 

VI. EVALUATION

 

According to the rules and regulations of the Saudi Commission for Health

Specialties, the following elements of evaluation are carried out:

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A. Annual Evaluation

 

The annual evaluation is carried out at the end of each year to assess the resident’s

ability and competency to be promoted to the following year. It consists of three

periodic assessment reports of resident’s performance by all contributing instructors

in the program and a written promotion test towards the end of the year that covers

basic science crash courses and the literature assignments of each year (residents

are referred to the general examination rules and regulations of the SCHS for

details). In addition, the annual evaluation of the fifth year will require each resident

to submit evidence of completing the treatment of a minimum of 30 cases during

their training period including completed transferred cases. Also, each resident is

required to submit the complete records and documentation of a minimum of 10

finished cases treated by the resident during his/her training period from start to

finish. These finished cases shall meet a minimum of 7 categories of the following

with a maximum of 2 cases per category:

1. Interceptive treatment in the primary or mixed dentition

2. Growth modification

3. Class I malocclusion treated with extraction or non-extraction

4. Class II malocclusion treated with extraction or non-extraction

5. Class III malocclusion treated with extraction or non-extraction

6. Malocclusion with transverse discrepancy

7. Malocclusion treated with interdisciplinary treatment approach

8. Dentofacial deformity treated with combined orthodontic and orthognathic

surgery treatment

9. Cleft lip and palate (single treatment phase or more)

Residents should follow previously stated guidelines when preparing each case

binder to be submitted as a final examination case.

 

B. Part I. Examination

 

This is a written examination to be conducted at the end of the first year of

residency. Passing part I examination will exempt the resident from the annual

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promotion examination (residents are referred to the general examination rules and

regulations of the SCHS for details).

 

C. Part II. Examination

 

Residents who complete all the requirements of the residency including the finished

clinical cases and passing the fifth-year end-year examination become eligible to sit

for the Part II examination at the end of the fifth year. The objective of this

examination is to assess the general theoretical and clinical knowledge as well as

skills of the resident and to evaluate his/her ability to practice orthodontics. Part II

examination consists of:

 

a. Written Examination

 

This is a comprehensive written examination on various orthodontic topics to

evaluate the candidate's knowledge for being eligible to sit for the clinical/oral

examination. The passing score for this written examination is 70% (residents are

referred to the general examination rules and regulations of the SCHS for details).

 

b. Clinical/Oral Examination

 

Eligibility for the final clinical/oral examination is based on passing the final Part II

written examination. The objective of this examination is to assess the ability of the

candidate to practice orthodontics and to utilize different orthodontic diagnostic and

treatment modalities for proper assessment and management of various orthodontic

cases. Eligible residents will be examined on the various aspects of orthodontic

diagnosis and treatment planning. Each resident will be challenged on selected

cases of his/her submitted final cases. Moreover, each resident will be provided

with complete initial records of a malocclusion case and will be asked to present the

diagnosis and treatment planning of the case during his/her interview with the

examination committee.

 

D. Program Evaluation

 

The scientific committee shall regularly evaluate the degree to which the goals of

the program have been met.

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VII. ADMISSION OF CANDIDATES WITH PREVIOUS FORMAL POSTGRADUATE

TRAINING IN ORTHODONTICS TO THE PROGRAM

 

The goal of admission of eligible candidates with previous formal post-graduate

training in orthodontics is to ensure proper standardization of knowledge and

clinical skills for obtaining a certificate of completion of the SSCPO. Candidates

with previous formal post-graduate training in orthodontics and desire to join the

SSCPO can apply to the SCHS/Orthodontic Scientific Committee. Recognition of

the previous training program is subjected to the rules and regulations of the SCHS

and the final judgment of the Orthodontic Scientific Committee. Each application is

individually examined and reviewed by the Orthodontic Scientific Committee and

the appropriate equalizations and exemptions are determined based on the contents

of the previous program curriculum of the applicant. The Orthodontic Scientific

Committee shall then decide the level at which the candidate will start the program

and all granted exemptions and remaining requirements of the SSCPO are identified

to the applicant. However, according to the SHCS rules and regulations, the

maximum equalization that can be granted for any candidate with previous formal

post-graduate education is 50% of the SSCPO. Candidates who are eligible for 50%

equalization should have completed a minimum of two years of formal postgraduate

training in a recognized program. Those candidates who are granted 50%

equalization of the SSCPO are legitimately exempted from Part I examination and

start the program at the third-year level (R3).

Candidates with previous formal post-graduate training in orthodontics who have

been exempted 50% of the SSCPO and admitted to the third year (R3) of the

program are recommended to start 25-30 cases of different malocclusion

classifications according to the following categories:

1. Interceptive treatment in the primary or mixed dentition

2. Growth modification

3. Class I malocclusion

4. Class II malocclusion

5. Class III malocclusion

17

6. Malocclusion with transverse discrepancy

7. Malocclusion with interdisciplinary treatment approach

8. Dentofacial deformity with combined orthodontic and orthognathic surgery

treatment approach

9. Cleft lip and palate

At the end of the fifth year of the program, each resident must submit an evidence

of completing the treatment of a minimum of 15 cases including completed

transferred cases. In addition, each resident is required to submit the complete

records and documentation of a minimum of 8 cases treated by the resident from

start to finish that shall meet a minimum of 5 categories of the following with a

maximum of 2 cases per one category:

1. Interceptive treatment in the primary or mixed dentition

2. Growth modification

3. Class I malocclusion treated with extraction or non-extraction

4. Class II malocclusion treated with extraction or non-extraction

5. Class III malocclusion treated with extraction or non-extraction

6. Malocclusion with transverse discrepancy

7. Malocclusion treated with interdisciplinary treatment approach

8. Dentofacial deformity treated with combined orthodontic and orthognathic

surgery treatment

9. Cleft lip and palate (single treatment phase or more)

 

VIII. CERTIFICATION

 

Upon successful completion of all requirements of the program and passing the Part

II Examination, the candidate shall receive a Certificate of Completion of the Saudi

Specialty Certificate Program in Orthodontics issued by the Saudi Commission for

Health Specialties.

 

 
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